Vacaville Unified School District

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Starting in Pre-School

Attendance Matters

Building Blocks for Learning

Attendance is not just important for school funding. Many subjects like math and science continuously build upon previously learned skills. Missing lessons often means that students miss out on fundamental skills needed to succeed academically.

 

Attendance is a major indicator of academic success.

 

When students miss too many days of school, they fall behind and struggle to keep up with their classmates.  Whether the days missed are due to illness, truancy or for any other reason, the end result for the student is the same – learning time is lost.  Children and adolescents will get sick at times and may need to stay at home, but we want to work with you to help minimize the number of days your student misses school.

Missed Days Add Up Quickly!

  • Just a few missed days a month adds up to several school weeks missed a year.
  • Both excused and unexcused absences can make it more difficult for your child to keep up with other students especially in math and reading.
  • Kindergarten and first grade are critical for your child. Missing school during these early years makes it more difficult for children to learn in later years and they often have trouble reading by the end of the third grade

Helpful Idea:

  • Make appointments with the doctor or dentist in the late afternoon so your child misses as little school as possible.
  • If your child must miss school, make sure you get his or her homework assignments and follow up to see if the work is completed and turned in.
  • Call the school as soon as you know your child will be absent and tell school staff why your child will be out and for how long.
  • Be prepared to get a doctor’s note when requested by school personnel.
  • If you need medical advice after business hours, most doctors’ offices have answering service 24 hours a day to assist you.
  • If your child has an emergency, call 911.

Work with Your Child and Your School

  • As the parent, be strong with your child and don’t let your child stay home when it is not necessary.  This will help your child succeed.
  • If your child has a chronic disease, make sure that the school staff is aware of the disease so the staff can assist your child if he or she becomes ill.  Information about your child’s chronic disease should be noted on the school emergency card.
  • For students with asthma: if your child has asthmas, the school needs an Asthma Action Plan completed by his or her doctor that includes permission to carry an inhaler at school.  Make sure that all supplies (inhaler, spacer, etc.) needed to manage your child’s asthma are at the school.
  • For students with diabetes: if your child has diabetes, the school needs a Diabetes Management Plan completed by his or her doctor.  Make sure that all supplies (insulin, blood sugar meter, test strips) needed to manage your child’s diabetes are at the school.​​​​​​​

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  • Keep an open line of communication with school staff and teachers.  The more the school knows about your child’s health, the better prepared everyone will be to work together for your child.